Good Contents Are Everywhere, But Here, We Deliver The Best of The Best.Please Hold on!
Data is Loading...
Your address will show here +12 34 56 78
Blog Post

I met Cynthia at a café in Goa, India, and before that, I had never realised how important it was to define my fears.

She did it with ease and grace with hers, threw it in a sentence whilst talking about the Roses she had named after two dear friends who were no longer in her life. “I am scared of dying alone”. That was her only fear, she said.

I teared up. I think it was a mix of surprise, awe and resonance I felt. I too, was scared of dying alone, more than anything, more than being afraid to Bungee Jump, and definitely more than the fear I felt driving in the backseat of any car in India.

That fear cut deep, touched an emotional part of me I didn’t even know I had. It tore me apart for one second, stripped me of all the layers of confidence and security I had built, and for a moment there, I was naked. Perhaps I was so afraid of it because it was, and still is, a fear I cannot face.

Other than unable to face it, this particular fear reveals a problem that many face: fear of the unknown. And this is why a lot of the time, when our future is uncertain, or we feel we don’t have control over it, we panic.

When Cynthia spoke her fear out loud, although emotional for having been hit with something I resonate with, I also felt extremely liberated. Hearing that fear spoken out loud, processing it my brain as words, felt really good. I knew it now.

It made it lighter, less scary.

That’s when I realised that defining your fears, saying them out loud, and facing them, is fundamental for removing them all together. Other than making them smaller, if you define and face your fears, you can really feel their weight decrease.

And also, in practical terms, what use is it to be afraid of something you don’t know. You can’t really control it, all you can do is trust it and choose your reactions for later.

Every time you face a fear, it makes facing all your other fears easier. This is an exercise that Cynthia had probably done, she had faced a lot of fears she told us. And this is why she could say with so much confidence that the only fear she really really had, was the one she could not face yet.

0

Blog Post

This is the moment women speak up.

This is the moment women express themselves.

This is the moment women march for women.

This is the moment men march for women.

This is the moment women reinvent relations with men.

This is the moment women become pilots.

This is the moment women become presidents.

This is the moment women are not just mothers.

This is the moment white women admit privilege.

This is the moment impunity for vile powerful sexual abusers ends.

This is the moment women stop competing with each other.

This is the moment women stop making excuses for men.

This is the moment we rise up, insist, and persist.

0

Blog Post, Women in the World

“I come from the same blood as Taliban,” Maria Toorpakai Wazir said in a recent speech at the Oslo Freedom Forum, a human rights conference that happens every year in May.

When asked how it was to live among terrorists, Toorpakai Wazir explains that in her area “the system is so conservative that you don’t know who is a Taliban and who is not.” There is a gun and drug culture, she continues, that has spread like wildfire in the recent decades. Because of the lack of government presence and infrastructure (mainly schools and hospitals), there is not much left for inhabitants to do. “These are lawless areas.”

Toorpakai Wazir was born in Waziristan, Pakistan, a semi-independent tribal region spreading across the border with Afghanistan. During the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in 1979, mujahidin escaped to Waziristan, which became a sanctuary for terrorists. The U.S. invasion of Afghanistan in 2002 also pushed many al Qaeda and Taliban elements into the region. The area is considered especially dangerous for women, both because of the presence of terrorists and the prevailing culturally conservative mindset. Women’s education, for example, is considered a vulgarity.

Also contributing to Waziristan’s tattered image is the fact that to those who aren’t residents, the region is difficult to enter. NGOs, human rights activists and media are seldom present. “It’s a restricted zone, so how can you hear the voices from those who want change, or don’t want to be terrorists?” she wonders.

A liberal family 

Toorpakai Wazir’s strong sense of freedom is rooted in her upbringing. She grew up in a different kind of family. Her father, Shamsul Qayyum Wazir, brought Toorpakai Wazir and her siblings up with exposure to liberal views; the women of the family had the same rights as the men. She explains that she grew up in a household where everyone could question everything, and no questions went unanswered. She touched on her home life last year during her appearance at the 7th Annual Women in the World New York Summit. Speaking with  Financial Times managing editor Gillian Test, Toorpakai Wazir said, “My father is very supportive and he believes in equality.”

Read the full story here

0

Blog Post

Last night I woke up at 4am and checked my phone to know what the hell was happening with the US election. I don’t know why I was so anxious, I am not from the United States, but I have grown up in a society that considered US the greatest and most powerful country in the world. So wanting to know whether the ‘most powerful individual in the world’ was going to be a masochistic, racist buffoon was well justified. The alternative was a woman who did not represent any major change in the country’s political nature, except maybe the fact that she was a woman.

This morning I woke up with the news that Mr GrabYourPussy had won. I was shocked, but I was not that surprised. What I was surprised about was a recurring phrase I was seeing on social media comments and posts: “America is the greatest country in the world”. Whether it was to reassure sad people who wanted to leave the country after the result, or in support of the new President-elect (“America will now be the greatest country in the world”) , it made no difference.


American exceptionalism
, essentially the thought of the United States as a uniquely free nation based on democratic ideals and personal liberty, rages through the country, and it has spread all over the world as a consequence. The thought that USA is the land of freedom and opportunity, economic prosperity and equal rights, is intrinsic in American society. Politicians use it to convince voters that they should vote for them, everyone has done it, left and right.

What has been deemed as ‘patriotism’, looks more like putting your country and your people on a pedestal higher than everyone else, and that constant need to repeat that phrase becomes redundant.

The result of this rhetoric being intrinsic in politics and society? A massive brainwash of a people that in reality live in what essentially is the biggest hypocrisy of the 21st century.

To quote Ian Tyrrell, “Many aspects of American history may be left out or distorted in the traditional narratives–particularly the histories of Amerindian peoples and the contribution of other ethnic groups that preceded the Anglo-Americans, e.g. Hispanics. Race and slavery are seen as tragic exceptions, and the abolition of the latter was viewed as a partial resolution, encompassed in Lincoln’s idea of a “new birth of freedom” in the Gettysburg Address.”

USA is a country driven by political and economic interests. It is a country where black people receive 10% longer sentences than whites, where black mothers have to give “the speech” to their children to avoid them getting killed by the police. It is a country where gun laws make it possible for a 20-year-old to walk into an elementary school and massacre 20 children (yes, fucking kids) and 6 teachers, and this happens over and over again. A country where lobbies control politics and politicians, essentially transferring the power to rich corporations, and narrowing the space for smaller businesses to have any influence. And again, a country that has made of interventionism a way forward, bringing the white savior complex to a whole other level. This does not look to me like “ The greatest country in the world”.

The United States alone contributes to large percentage of the world’s carbon emission, leading to global warming, perhaps the greatest problem of our time.

So maybe it is time to look at the big picture and step back a little bit, and get real. There is no more hiding behind that phrase anymore, because shit just got real.

Maybe, some people had already woken up to the idea that US is not the greatest country in the world, and were tired of politicians playing that card over and over again. A while ago Trump said about American exceptionalism: “I don’t like the term, I’ll be honest with you, I don’t think it’s a very nice term, we’re exceptional, you’re not … I never liked the term.”.

I am more than sure that this election has woken many people up. Who thought that the greatest country in the world would vote their president, the most important person in the world, to be a buffoon who said this at one of his rallies: “Its freezing here, and they talk about global warming, its freezing”.

You get what you deserve, always.

note: This piece is not meant to say that other countries are better than the US, nor is it an attack on the myriad of people who believe in change and truth. It is meant to be a point of reflection, and it is my own and personal opinion.

originally published on Medium

0